FW1-3: A Lesson In Murder

Detailed summaries. Some to be revised.

FW1-3: A Lesson In Murder

Postby Lynnedean » Sun Dec 29, 2013 3:04 pm

Foyle's War 1-3: A Lesson In Murder detailed summary

June 1940

A young man by the name of David Beale addresses a panel of assessors who are considering his request to be exempted from military service on the grounds of conscientious objection: "War is evil. It's irrational and if history has taught us anything, it's that war only leads to more war, more killing, bigger armies. And you want me to join up. What you are asking me to do it to take a lesson in murder. That's really all it is and I'm standing here today because that is a lesson I refuse to take."

Judge Lawrence Gascoigne dismisses his appeal. Beale protests and is dragged out of the tribunal, arrested for breach of the peace and taken to the Hastings police station where the desk sergeant tells him that they have a special welcome for conscientious objectors. The young man is stripped naked and thrown into a cell where two officers subject him to harsh treatment, hosing him with a fierce jet of cold water.

**
Later that day, Beale's wife tries to see him but is told to return in official visiting hours. That night a duty policeman finds Beale hanging in his cell, still naked.

**
Foyle arrives at Hastings Town Hall for a meeting of the Invasion Committee comprised of himself, Lawrence Gascoigne and Raymond Brooks, a local businessman. Brooks disagrees with Foyle about how much information to give the defence volunteers. He says that Hastings has been designated a nodal point Class A which means that they are expected to hold out for a full seven days in the event of a German invasion, and he wants to tell his local defence volunteers what the situation truly is. Foyle says it is unnecessary to be too specific, as they can prepare for the worst without painting too vivid a picture: "Preventing panic is a large part of our job."

Gascoigne agrees with Foyle and draws the meeting to a close. Brooks is not pleased. As Gascoigne walks with Foyle down the stairs of the town hall, he tells him that Brooks is a good man who was in the last war but feels left out this time around.

**
Back in the police station, Foyle tells Sam that he can't bear the thought of cooking for himself, so instead of taking him home she can drop him at Carlo's restaurant just around the corner from his house. Sam takes him there and manages to wangle an invitation to join her boss.

Carlo Lucciano greets Foyle warmly as he enters. Foyle introduces him to Sam and Carlo tells her to look after her boss because he works too hard. A young waiter brings wine to the table and takes an interest in Sam. Foyle introduces him as Tony, Carlo's son. When Tony goes to fetch the food, Foyle explains that he was born in Bermondsey and has never been out of the country.

**
In the large country home of Lawrence Gascoigne, an eleven-year-old boy goes into the library and after looking in the drawers, begins copying something into a battered exercise book. Emily Gascoigne finds him there and he runs away. She then joins her husband and daughter Susan in the drawing room where a conversation ensues about the boy, who is an evacuee from London taken in by the Gascoignes at Susan's encouragement. Emily says he is ungovernable and is always poking and prying, and her husband, too, is unhappy at his being there. Susan says they do not have to worry any more as Joe's father is coming to take him back home.

**
Foyle and Sam leave Carlo's restaurant. As they stand beside the Wolseley, Tony emerges from the restaurant and, to Foyle's amusement, startles Sam by asking if she will go dancing with him on Friday evening. Sam accepts and as Tony retreats into the restaurant Foyle gives his driver a knowing look, pops his trilby onto his head and tells her that he will walk home.

**
Late in the evening, a young man calls into the restaurant and finds Tony sweeping up. Tony is not pleased to see him. His friend Jack tells him that he'd been let out of Borstal (detention for young offenders) early because places are needed for war detainees. He says he is thinking of paying a visit to the judge who sentenced him. When Tony asks what he will do to him, he replies, "I'll think of something."

**
Next day while playing golf with Foyle, Hugh Reid brings up the subject of the man who died in custody. He says everything points to suicide, but all the officers on duty that night have been very unforthcoming, backing one another up to the hilt. Foyle remarks that it probably means they are lying and Reid says that is what he is afraid of, and asks Foyle to make inquiries from outside the uniformed branch.

**
Theo Howard goes to the farm run by David Beale's widow Florence to give her his condolences. He says he would like to meet the man who headed the tribunal. "He kills David and we do nothing? Because we're pacifists, that's what we do." Florence says there is nothing they can do and he replies, "I wonder."

**
At a quarter past one next morning, Emily's sleep is disturbed by her husband saying that he has heard a noise downstairs. Gascoigne goes to investigate and a short while later Emily sits up in bed, unable to understand why she suddenly feels very cold.

The sound of breaking glass brings Emily and Susan running down the stairs. Someone has thrown a brick through the window. Gascoigne picks it up and finds a piece of paper attached on which printed words have been stuck. The message reads: "You too will receive justice."

**
Foyle speaks to the Gascoignes later that day about the note. He wonders why, if someone really intended the judge harm, he or she would send a warning.

As Emily shows Foyle out, Joe watches from hiding. Foyle comments that it is a beautiful house and Emily says that it has been in her family for generations. Her husband complains that it is a rambling place and they use only half of it. He says they sometimes talk of moving somewhere a bit more manageable, but Emily immediately responds that it is her home and she would never do that.

Foyle finds Joe beside the Wolseley, scribbling in his notebook. Sam warns the boy that there is a policeman standing behind him and he takes off. Foyle asks who he is, to which Sam replies, "I don't know, but he's got our number."

In the car, Sam suggests to Foyle that the words stuck onto the threatening note be traced to see which papers they came from, as that might tell him something about the person who sent them. Her boss replies dryly, "Well that had occurred to me, y'know."

As they travel, Foyle and Sam do not see a man run across the road on his way to the Gascoigne's summerhouse.

**
At the station, Milner reports to his boss that there were four officers on duty the night Beale died. He thinks the duty officer William Ferris is the one the DCS should see, especially as he has a brother wounded at Dunkirk, which might be relevant, Beale being a conscientious objector. He points out that Beale's hair was wet, his clothes were damp when he was found and his shirt buttons were done up the wrong way. Foyle is thoughtful for a moment and then produces the threatening note, which he asks Milner to check out. "And if you don't know what to do with it, ask Sam." He gives a little grin, but Milner is mystified.

Foyle examines the cell in which Beale's body was found. He looks at a reel of emergency fire hose immediately outside the door, and finds it wet.

In an interview room, he questions Sergeant Ferris in conversational tone as one policeman to another. Ferris remarks flippantly that perhaps Beale hanged himself because he was scared of the dark. Foyle says, "Well, I can't put that in a report, you see, and that's what all this is about – reports. You see, man dies in police custody and we've got to investigate, even a man like Beale. Yes, it's a waste of my time, a waste of your time, but…" Ferris gets the impression that his boss does not like conscientious objectors and when Foyle responds sympathetically to being told that the sergeant's brother was wounded at Dunkirk, he believes he has an ally and offers to tell the DCS everything "off the record". Foyle says that he probably knows but just needs a few details to fill in the blanks. He explains that he knows Beale was dressed only after he was found because his buttons were done up the wrong way. "And his hair was wet. Was that because, em, you sprayed him down with that hose?"

Ferris says that was just a joke. He admits it was his idea, but says he didn't think the man would hang himself. Foyle smiles conspiratorially and remarks, "Not that he's any great loss."

The sergeant replies, "One dead conscie, who cares?"

Foyle's smile fades as he looks down at his file and says quietly, "Yeah."

Ferris asks what the DCS is going to put in his report.

"Well, I thought I'd start with your arrest for aggravated assault, which resulted in this man's suicide, and finish off with your dismissal from the police force."

**
Susan Gascoigne meets Peter Buckingham in the summerhouse and tells him he shouldn't be on the premises, as her father has forbidden her to see him again. Howard is angry, saying the man is just a snob. Susan says that she loves Theo but is worried what her father will do if he discovers him there. He tells her that he would give everything to be with her and doesn't understand why she can't feel the same way. As he leaves, he passes under a tree in which Joe is hiding, and writing in his notebook.

**
Foyle visits Florence Beale on her farm and finds her teaching a class of young children in her kitchen. They walk from the house and across a busy farmyard to a barn. She explains that the place has become quite a centre for refugees of one sort or another and friends come with their children. They are pacifists. Foyle apologises for what happened to her husband, saying that it was wrong and promising that the people involved will be punished. Florence introduces Foyle to Theo Howard, a good friend. Howard says that Foyle has only come to assuage his guilt. Foyle says that he has come because he thinks it is the right thing to do.

Howard asks why he's not investigating Lawrence Gascoigne, and when Foyle asks why he should, replies that the judge has presided over five tribunals in the last month. He dismissed four appeals, but to one he turned a strangely sympathetic ear. Stephen Brooks is now an official conscientious objector although no one in the farm community has ever met him and he is now working in Dorset with the Forestry Commission, well out of harm's way. Howard says that Stephen's father is rich and knows Gascoigne, and that Beale always said that the judge was corrupt. Foyle tells him the wording of the note: "You too will receive justice." Howard says he doesn't know anything about it, but someone has got the right idea.

**
In the station later in the day, Milner reports that he has been able to identify a couple of the words on the note as having come from the Illustrated and the Daily Express. "I'd say that's the work of someone not out of the top drawer." Foyle comments that perhaps that is what they are meant to think. Milner says a stain on the paper looks like machine oil.

**
Milner goes home after his shift at the station and finds a suitcase standing in the hallway. His wife is making the tea in the kitchen. He gives her a kiss on the cheek, but she says "Not now." As she lays the table, says that the postman has delivered a lot of leaflets. Milner asks what they say, and she explains "Hide your food, hide your maps, lock up your bicycles, don't leave anything for the Germans. Makes you nervous to go out."

Milner asks about the suitcase, and his wife tells him that she is going to visit her sister Kate in Wales. She says that there is plenty of food in the pantry and she'll only be gone a couple of weeks. "You don't mind, do you?" Milner plainly does mind, but he says he doesn't. He tells her that he will miss her. Jane looks at him for a moment and then says, "I'll write."

**
In the police station, Foyle is surprised to see Sam dressed in a pretty blue dress and wearing her hair down. He obviously approves. She explains that she changed in the station to go straight to the dance with Tony. She says that the boy is not really her type but that she didn't want to let him down. Foyle looks at her appreciatively. "Well you won't do that. Have a good time." Sam smiles, and leaves.

As the evening wears on, Foyle sits at his desk reading the tribunal report on David Beale.

**
At the dance, Tony explains to Sam that his father and her boss have been friends for a long time. Carlo had made the cake for Foyle's wedding.

Peter Buckingham is at the dance, and greets Susan as she arrives. She tells him that she shouldn't really be there. She is not relaxed as they dance and Peter comments that she is scared. "You don't understand my father. Sometimes I wish..."

Jack Winters comes over to Sam and Tony's table. Sam takes an instant dislike to him and when he asks if she would mind if he joined them, says that as a matter of fact she would, and rises to encourage Tony to dance with her. Jack is not pleased with her response. As Tony joins Sam on the dance floor his friend reminds him that they are going to meet up later that night.

Under cover of darkness, someone is preparing a murderous trap in the Gascoignes' summerhouse. A grenade is fastened to an interior post and wire leading from the pin is attached to the door handle.

**
Next morning, Gascoigne comes to the breakfast table saying he has had a telephone call from someone telling him to go to the summerhouse because something has been left there for him, but that he is not going to look. Joe gets up from the table saying he will go. Emily sternly tells the boy that he is not to go into the summerhouse. Joe leaves the room in a sulk. Once outside, he makes a beeline for the summerhouse and goes straight in. A loud explosion rends the air.

Foyle and Milner investigate the crime. As the boy's body is taken away by an ambulance crew, Milner observes that the grenade was meant for Gascoigne, but Foyle looks unsure.

In the Gascoigne house, Milner asks for confirmation that Joe's father is coming today and Gascoigne says yes, but asks Foyle if he would meet the man at the station because he doesn't think he can face him. Foyle indicates that he will and asks to see Joe's room. Gascoigne leads the two policeman upstairs and as they go, they do not notice the usually self-possessed Emily burst into tears.

Foyle finds Joe's notebook under the bed, and turns the pages to reveal scribbled words and drawings of buildings and people. Gascoignes remarks that the boy was eleven but had the level of a six-year-old.

As they return downstairs, Foyle asks the judge to make a list of trials and tribunals he has presided over. Milner asks him if he knows of anyone who might want to hurt him. Gascoigne replies that he recently had a set-to with a man called Peter Buckingham, who had forced his attentions on Susan. Gascoigne tells them that Buckingham is a machine operator and works at the factory nearby that used to be a farm but is now a munitions factory. Foyle tells the judge that he will put two or three men outside the house for his protection.

After Foyle and Milner have left, Emily expresses distaste at having the policemen on the premises, saying that it would never have been allowed in her father's day. Gascoigne says that times have changed.

**
Foyle meets Joe's father from the London train. He takes him into a waiting room and gives him the terrible news of his son's death. The distraught Pearson tells him that he never wanted Joe to leave London, but the authorities warned of bombing raids and Joe's mother said he would be safe in the country. In the anger of grief, Pearson demands to see Gascoigne. Foyle is very moved. He tells Pearson that if he chooses to stay he will find him a room, but there is no point in confronting Gascoigne.

**
On the farm, Florence asks Howard where he was the night before, saying she has heard that someone has tried to kill the judge. He is astonished that she could suspect him of being the culprit as she knows that he is against killing. However, he thinks it a shame that the murder attempt was not successful.

**
Tony Lucciano arrives at the police station to ask Sam if she will go out with him again tonight. She appears reluctant but he says he needs to talk to her about something and so she agrees to meet him when her shift finishes at six o'clock.

In his office, Foyle tells Milner that he wants to put somebody inside Gascoigne's house as well as outside, but they are short staffed. He accepts when the sergeant volunteers. He gives the list of Gascoigne's cases to Milner and asks if he recognises any of the names. Sam looks at them and says she recognises the name of Jack Winters. Foyle takes note and tells Milner to get over to Gascoignes.

**
Milner arrives at the Gascoigne house. The judge tells him that he is not entirely happy with the situation but he realises the necessity. He introduces Milner to his daughter.

**
Foyle goes to the munitions factory, but the foreman refuses him entry, saying Foyle will have to talk to the War Office if he wants to come in. Foyle asks if Peter Buckingham is there and the foreman says that he can talk to him but he can't come into the factory, and Buckingham can't discuss his work.

Buckingham talks to Foyle just inside the gate. He tells him that used to meet Susan in the summerhouse until her father caught them and he has not been back since then because he is not seeing Susan any more. Foyle gets confirmation that Buckingham works as a machine operator. He thanks the man and shakes his hand.

As they walk away from the gate, Foyle remarks to Sam that it is odd for a machine operator to have clean hands. She suggests that Buckingham might have washed them and Foyle says maybe. He then observes the unevenness of the ground and wonders about the safety of transporting explosives over such. "And metal working, hardening steel? You'd need furnaces, lots of heat, wouldn't you? Well, there's no chimneys."

**
Susan talks to Milner on the veranda of her home. She tells him that Joe hated being there but she understood that coming from the East End of London, the huge house must have seemed to him like another planet. She says she can't see the point of having servants' quarters when you can't afford to have servants. She tells of how Joe was one of the last children left on the station, the others having been picked first because they were nice-looking or strong enough to work. She sheds a tear. "I chose him because he reminded me of me… left out."

**
Foyle is enjoying a drink with Carlo in the restaurant. The Italian says that remembers the first day his friend came to the restaurant with Mrs Foyle. Foyle says that they weren't actually married then and teases his friend by adding, "And d'y'know, that was the worst meal we ever had. I'm surprised we ever came back, y'know?"

Carlo bemoans the fact that the world is not the same now. He is concerned about what will happen to him and his family if Mussolini declares war. He says he also worries about Tony. Foyle asks about Jack Winters. Carlo says he does not think he is any good, and asks Foyle to tell him if he ever thinks Tony is getting himself involved in anything. Foyle replies that the only thing Tony is involved with at the moment is his driver.

While they are walking out that evening, Tony tells Sam that he has joined up, but he's not sure how his dad will take the news. He is very nervous about being involved in the fighting. He thinks it would be easier if there was someone he could correspond with while he's away, but he's never had a real girlfriend. Sam assures him that she will write to him.

**
Foyle goes to see Raymond Brooks in his imposing office, and asks about his connection with Gascoigne. Brooks says that he knows the judge because they are both on the Defence Committee, but he denies that they have any other association apart from seeing each other from time to time socially. Foyle asks if he has been to Gascoigne's house recently and he says he has, on a confidential matter. Foyle asks if it was to do with his son. Brooks at first says that he prefers not to speak about Stephen, but then tells Foyle that he did go to see Gascoigne about his son. When the war began he had expected that Stephen would do his part, like his father in the first war, but the boy told him he had no intention of fighting. They had a bitter argument and had hardly spoken since. When Brooks heard that Stephen was attempting to be classed as a conscientious objector, he decided to tell Gascoigne that his son was simply afraid to fight. He did so because it was a matter of pride. Gascoigne had been angry and wouldn't listen. Brooks wasn't surprised when Stephen's appeal was granted because he supposed Gascoigne did what he had to do, but as far as he is concerned, he no longer has a son.

**
In one of the farm buildings, Howard tucks a pistol into the waistband of his trousers. Florence sees him leaving and asks what he's doing. He will not say, but asks her to forgive him and tells her that he will return soon.

**
Foyle makes a phone call from his office, asking to be given any information that can be found about the factory's connection with the War Office. Hugh Reid calls in and tells him that he has discovered that Peter Buckingham is not a metal worker but a carpenter by trade. Foyle shows him Joe's notebook and asks what his colleague makes of it. He points out a page with FAC RAY and 345 PAY S000 scribbled alongside the drawing of a car. Foyle wonders if the boy could have meant the factory near the house.

**
Susan and Milner are talking outside the Gascoigne house when the uniformed policemen on watch give chase to a man seen in the trees. The man gets away and they do not know that it is Theo Howard.

**
Late that evening, Susan and Milner talk in the drawing room of the Gascoigne house. Susan asks Milner if he is married and very much in love, then apologises for asking personal questions but says she has no one else to talk to. She tells the sergeant that someone she has met has asked her to marry him and that she wants to because she loves him, but her father won't hear of it. Milner tries to discourage her from speaking to him in this way, but she persists. When she looks as though she is very near to tears, he places a comforting arm around her shoulder, at which point Gascoigne enters the room and finds them in what he believes to be a compromising situation. He will not listen to an explanation and orders Susan from the room, and Milner out of the house. The sergeant argues that he is there for the judge's protection, but Gascoigne is adamant.

**
As Carlo is cashing up the day's restaurant takings, Tony is getting ready to go out. His father is concerned that he might be going to meet Winters and angrily tells his son that the police know about the man. Tony says that he needs to talk to Carlo about something, but his father is so angry about Winters that Tony just says to forget it, and leaves the restaurant, telling his father not to wait up.

**
Later than night, a loud shot is heard within the Gascoigne house. Jack Winters and Tony Lucciano run across the grounds but are apprehended by the policemen on guard.

**
A while later, Foyle and Milner watch as the body of Lawrence Gascoigne is removed from his study. The two detectives agree that it looks as though the judge was the target when Joe was killed. Foyle checks with Milner that there is no sign of a weapon and that all the doors and windows were locked. Milner assures him that nothing has been tampered with. Foyle wonders why, if the man really thought his life was in danger, he would choose to dismiss his bodyguard.

Gascoigne's wife and daughter enter the study, and Foyle asks Emily about what happened. Emily explains that her husband and daughter had an argument. Gascoigne was very angry and wanted to be alone. Later she heard a shot. Foyle inquires if a gun is kept in the house and Susan replies that her father kept one in his desk because he was worried about an invasion. Foyle checks the desk drawers but finds no gun.

**
Later, back at the station, Sam tells her boss that Tony has joined up.

Foyle interviews Tony and asks angrily why he went to the house. Tony says it was Winters' idea to break in and make a mess and he'd been unable to talk him out of it. Foyle asks why he hasn't told his dad about having enlisted, to which Tony replies that he was going to, but after this they probably won't take him. Foyle says that they will take him as he hasn't actually been arrested. As he leaves the room, Foyle urges, "Tell your father!"

Milner interviews Winters, who denies everything and claims that a bag and crowbar that have been found belong to Tony.

Foyle meets Carlo in the police station and assures him that his son is all right. He tells him that Tony has joined up but has said nothing because Carlo was angry with him, and Carlo says he is proud of his son because Fascism must be fought. Foyle sees Tony being brought to the main door. "Well will you tell him that? He's free to go, take him home." Foyle watches as his friend goes to his son and throws his arms around him.

**
At the factory gate, the foreman again refuses Foyle entry, but the DCS says that the War Office has no knowledge of the factory, so if his questions are not answered he will arrest the foreman for obstruction. The gate is opened.

Foyle and Sam are taken into the main building and to their astonishment find themselves confronted by hundreds of coffins and workmen making more. The foreman explains that the Ministry of Health is preparing for Luftwaffe attacks on London that will result in thousands dead. For the sake of morale nobody must know about the coffins being made. Foyle asks no more questions.

**
The DCS goes again to see Brooks, and asks if Gascoigne ever visited the defence volunteers unit. Brooks says he did once. Foyle then confronts him with the fact that he has been lying about his visit to Gascoigne and about his son. He shows Joe's notebook and explains that it is a record of happenings around the Gascoigne home. He indicates a note about the businessman's visit, saying that FAC RAY was not a misspelling of factory. FAC, together with a number written beneath, is actually Brooks' car registration, and RAY is simply his name. Foyle then explains that Joe wrote his twos the wrong way round, so S000 is in fact 2000, the amount that Brooks paid to ensure his son would not have to fight, and that amount was drawn from his bank account the day before he met with Gascoigne. Brooks had said he was no longer in contact with his son when he had actually phoned Dorset from his office a dozen times. Brooks can see there is no denying and admits bribing Gascoigne.

**
Theo Howard has joined up and Florence has come to the train station see him off to his training unit. He says he hopes she can forgive him, but she assures him there is nothing to forgive, although she doesn't understand what he is doing. Theo tries to explain. Believing that Gascoigne was responsible for Beale's death, he had gone to the house with an old gun from the first war. He never got a chance to find out if it still worked, because there were too many policemen around, but it made him realise he wanted to kill. He felt in the grip of a kind of a hatred that was overpowering. Beale talked about war as a lesson in murder and Howard believed he was right. He still believed in pacifism, but he was capable of killing, so he may as well use that capability and do his bit to save civilisation. "I can fight, so I should."

Foyle is seeing Joe's father onto the London train. As Pearson talks of being in contact with the boy while he was at the Gascoignes', a thought suddenly hits Foyle and he asks if Joe knew his father was coming to take him home. Pearson says he rang to tell him. Foyle asks if Joe said anything and Pearson replies that he did say he had a lot to tell him. Foyle mutters to himself, "I'll bet he did." As the train pulls out, Pearson asks if Foyle knows who killed Joe and Foyle replies, "Yes."

**
Foyle returns to the Gascoigne home to arrest Emily for the murder of her husband. Foyle tells Susan and Buckingham, who is also at the house, what has lead to the arrest. Joe was about to return to his parents, but Gascoigne had learned that the boy had witnessed him accepting a bribe and was fearful that Joe would tell his father. The throwing of the brick through the window and the making the note were Gascoigne's own doing. He tried to implicate Buckingham by using cuttings from papers he imagined he would read and added smears of machine oil because he thought he was a machine operator in the factory. He took a grenade from the defence volunteers and set the trap in the summerhouse, then faked the phone call the following morning, knowing that a strange phone call, a secret parcel and telling Joe not to go into the summerhouse would tempt the boy. It would look as though Joe had been killed accidentally and Gascoigne would not be suspected. As to her father's death, Foyle explains to Susan that when he was shot the house was secure. The gun used was his own, but only the judge, Susan and Emily knew it was there. "And it wasn't you."

**
In the police station, Emily tells Foyle that she had suspected something was wrong. Then she realised that the reason she had felt so cold the night the brick came through the window was because her husband had opened the front door to go outside. She confronted him and he admitted to killing Joe. He said that the boy was always snooping, and had threatened to tell about the bribe. Gascoigne had scrimped and saved to maintain the huge house and wasn't going to lose everything because of an East End brat. He spat at his wife that she was the reason the child had died. Distraught, Emily had taken the pistol from the desk and saying "You too will receive justice!" shot her husband dead.

**
In the station after ten that night, Hugh Reid finds Foyle still at his desk. He says that the Gascoigne affair is a nasty business and Foyle replies that these are evil times. Reid says that they are getting worse, explaining that it has been reported on the news that Italy has declared war and people in London's East End have already reacted by rioting and causing fires.

**
In the early hours of the morning, incensed local residents, armed with burning torches and screaming hatred, march on Carlo's restaurant. They smash the lower windows and hurl a Molotov cocktail into the ground floor. It explodes in a fury of flame.

When they learn what has happened, Sam and Foyle go to Carlo's and find Tony sitting in utter desolation outside the burnt-out restaurant. Foyle asks, "Where is he?" and receives the answer he dreads. "He's dead… The firemen got me out. Dad didn't make it."

Sam cries.

Tony asks, "What sort of a world is this, Mr Foyle?" Foyle says nothing, but indicates by the slightest nod of his head that he wonders, too.

Tony walks away. Foyle remains standing with pain in his heart, staring at the smouldering embers of a cherished friendship.

Sam approaches him. "I don't know what to say."

Quietly, Foyle replies, "Neither do I."

***
"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long." ~ Ogden Nash
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