FW1-4: Eagle Day

Detailed summaries. Some to be revised.

FW1-4: Eagle Day

Postby Lynnedean » Sun Dec 29, 2013 2:47 pm

Foyle's War 1-4: Eagle Day detailed summary

August 1940

Late one night, a bombing raid lays waste to a residential area of London. Joyce Davies, who has been away overnight, returns home in the morning to find her house in ruins and her husband dead. However, it is immediately apparent that Graham Davies did not die as a result of the bombing but because someone had attacked him with a knife.

**
It is early in the morning when Pilot Officer Andrew Foyle alights from a car outside 31 Steep Lane in Hastings and thanks the driver for the lift home. Christopher Foyle is awakened by the sound of someone moving around downstairs, and on investigation finds his son rooting around in the kitchen, looking for something to eat. Andrew explains that he has been posted not far from home.

The two men talk as they eat breakfast. Andrew explains that he was given a lift home by Bruce Leighton-Morris, a friend from his days at Oxford who is now a pilot working with the Crown Film Unit. He tells his dad that he has finished his training but instead of being attached to a squadron, has been sent to Hastings on a classified operation that he can't tell anyone about, including those closest to him. Andrew then looks intently at his father and remarks on the fact that he never talks about the last war. After some prompting, Foyle explains reluctantly that they were the worst three years of his life. He volunteered before conscription was introduced in 1916, went in as a private, served in France and came out as what they called a temporary officer and gentleman "only because there was nobody else left."

Soberly, Andrew inquires if his father has ever killed anyone. After a pause, Foyle asks if he is worried about having to. Andrew replies, "I suppose I have begun to think about it. Well? Did you?"

Foyle stares down at his plate, remembering. He is just about to speak when there is a knock at the front door. He sighs in exasperation at the interruption, and ignoring the summons for a moment, says quietly, "Yyyes, I did. And all I can say is you get through it."

The knock comes again and as Foyle rises to fetch his jacket he asks his son to answer door, explaining that it will be his driver. Andrew is surprised to find a young woman in uniform on the doorstep. He remarks that his father hadn't told him that his driver was such a pretty girl. Sam is not impressed by what she takes to be a typical cocky young pilot's response, and Andrew apologises for offending her, saying that he just didn't expect to meet a WAAF driving his dad. Sam replies coolly that she was "hoping to cook or knit balaclavas for His Majesty's forces, but here I am."

**
On the way to the police station, Sam tells her boss that her father is coming down to Hastings to see her. She is concerned because her father never wanted her to join the MTC and she thinks he will be equally disapproving of her working with the police.

In the station, Milner greets his superior with the news about the finding of Graham Davies' body in the wreckage of his bombed house. The two police officers visit the site of the murder and Foyle finds a gold locket and chain in the dead man's clutched fist. Milner muses that it could have been worn by the killer and torn off during the attack, which could point to the culprit being a young girl, but Foyle looks dubious. An ARP warden tells them that the dead man was married man with no children and had worked as a delivery driver.

**
The wardens have taken Joyce Davies to a nearby pub. Foyle and Milner go there to talk to her. Joyce is distraught at her husband's death and the fact that she had not been there when he died. She cannot understand why anyone would want to kill him. She tells the policemen that Davies had collected art works from a London gallery called something like Wilson or Winstone, and delivered them to Wales the day before. Under gentle questioning from a sympathetic Foyle, Joyce admits that she was with a man called Trevor Thompson in Brighton overnight. Her face creases with pain and she weeps as she explains that her husband was unaware of the affair. She claims that she did love him and would never have wanted to hurt him. When shown the locket, she says she has never seen it before.

**
Back at the bombed house, Foyle speaks with Frank Watson, a member of the Home Guard who was on patrol in the area last night. The old man is hard of hearing needs some questions repeated. He reports that around half past ten he gave directions to a man roughly Foyle's height and about the age of fifty, who was looking for Henley Terrace.

**
Wing Commander Martin Keller welcomes Andrew to the Manor, his new base near the Hastings coast. Keller is impressed with the young pilot's instructor's report, but says that flying under the Forth Bridge when training in Scotland was a stunt that risked not only his neck but also a valuable aircraft. It did, however, indicate an aptitude for low-level flying, which is why he had been assigned to the Hastings base.

Keller tells Andrew that he is about to be let into the most important secret of the war, which must be shared with no one. As they drive to an RAF station on an airfield a little further up the coast, the wing commander explains that the staff there are involved in the development of RDF, Radio Direction Finding, also know as radar, and Andrew will be making a vital contribution to the work. The system will make it possible to detect incoming enemy aircraft at night, in cloud, before they reach the coast. Sea Air Stations, called Chain Home, have been established all along the coast. These are directly connected to Fighter Command HQ in north London, which in turn is connected to the sector control rooms in different parts of the country that control Britain's defences. The officer responsible for the work being done in Hastings is Group Captain Alastair Graeme, who trained all the people involved.

**
Inside the RAF station, Graeme explains that they are engaged in fine-tuning and that Andrew is to assist by flying a Spitfire at night at a low altitude to try to avoid being tracked by the radar system. He issues a stern warning to the young pilot that he must be sure to turn on his aircraft's IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) signal, because without it, coastal defences unaware of the exercises will believe him to be the enemy, and fire at him. He shows Andrew the operations room and introduces him to three WAAF plotters who are working with radar screens, maps and graphs.

**
In his office, DCS Foyle is studying the locket and chain. Milner reports that the man Joyce Davies says she was with the night her husband was killed backs up her story. Foyle is thinking of the man who sought directions and wonders if a murderer would have to ask the way to his victim's house. Milner agrees it is unlikely, but points out that it was blackout and half the signposts had been removed.

Foyle points out to the sergeant that a recent repair has been made to the locket, and instructs him to see if any jewellers in Hastings recognise it. He says he will go to the Whittington Gallery in London that they now know Davies worked for, as it could be that the driver's involvement in transporting priceless Impressionist paintings had something to do with his murder.

**
Harold Smith dashes into his house in Eastbourne. He reads aloud from a newspaper the account of the finding of Davies' body and the subsequent police investigation. His wife reacts with alarm and Smith is plainly distressed. "What are we going to do?"

**
The next morning, Andrew climbs into his 'plane and sets off on his first low flying exercise. The radar system fails to track him, although the echo from his IFF is detected. Shortly before he lands, Andrew's voice is heard over the speaker in the operations room: "This is Target Spitfire to Base. I've just dropped a bomb. You're all goners!" The young pilot rolls his Spitfire in victory, and laughs.

From a window in the Manor he is watched by Wing Commander Keller, who then turns his attention back to a non-uniformed visitor called Henderson. He thanks the man for bringing something about Andrew Foyle to his attention and asks the name of the friend who was mentioned. Henderson reports that it is Bruce Leighton-Morris and that they are not planning to arrest him yet, but that if they do, they will keep the wing commander informed.

**
In the Manor, Andrew sits down to eat lunch with Sergeant Anne Roberts, one of the WAAF plotters. She compliments him on his flying skill and says they will have to try harder to catch him next time. Anne tells him that she has an aunt who runs a flower shop in Hastings whom she sometimes sees at weekends. Andrew looks at the food on his plate with evident distaste and suggests that they go out to lunch instead. While picnicking in a sunny spot in the countryside, Andrew asks Anne if she has a boyfriend, and she tells him that it is none of his business. He replies, "Oh, I see. It's like everything else in this place – top secret."

**
As Sam halts the Wolseley outside the Whittington Gallery, she asks Foyle how long he will be. When he says that he has no idea, she explains that Bond Street is just around the corner and she was thinking of having her hair done. Foyle can't believe what he is hearing, but before he can reply, Sam adds, "For tonight… my father." Foyle struggles with what to say, but just gives up and tells her he'll be about an hour.

Inside the gallery, the curator Austin Carmichael explains to Foyle that the building houses a collection of works by French Impressionists acquired by Dorothy Whittington, an American living in London and now in her nineties. The contents had all been transferred to a place of safety in Wales for the duration of the war. Davies transported them, but the security procedure was impregnable. An independent witness supervised the removal. Every picture was entered in a signed ledger and loaded into a lorry, which was then locked and the key kept by the curator. The only other key was in Wales. On arrival in the facility in Wales, every picture was checked off against the ledger as it was unloaded. Foyle examines the ledger and asks about individual letters beside the entries. Carmichael explains that it is his own form of shorthand: W is woodcut, L lithograph, S sketch and D drawing.

**
In the Manor, Anne tells Andrew that she and a friend called Lucy came to the unit together, but the other woman died recently. Andrews asks how, but Anne stalls, at which point they are interrupted by Keller. Andrew tells him that he hasn't a billet, but he can stay at home with his father who is a detective chief superintendent in Hastings. Keller says flatly that he had better stay with him and then tells Anne that she should return to the operations room.

**
In the station, Foyle and Milner agree that Carmichael's security seems foolproof. Foyle considers it unlikely that Davies' wife had anything to do with his murder and continues to ponder the link between Davies and valuable paintings owned by a woman who could well be dead by the end of the war.

**
When Sam meets with her father in the Royal Victoria Hotel on Hastings seafront her suspicions are confirmed. Her parents are concerned about stories they have heard about young women in the armed forces. Sam jokes, "Up with the lark, to bed with a WREN! That's what they say." Stewart is shocked and says it's no joke. Sam tries to assure him that she will be all right, especially as she is with the police, not the military, but her father tells her that she must return home immediately. He says it would be different if she was doing something important for the war effort, but all she is doing is driving a policeman around and getting involved in murders. Sam protests to no avail.

**
In the Manor, Keller tells Graeme that Pilot Officer Foyle's father is a detective chief superintendent with "something of a reputation". He goes on to say that he overheard Andrew talking to Anne Roberts about Lucy Smith. Graeme looks very thoughtful.

**
In 31 Steep Lane, Foyle is a little exasperated when all that his son will tell him about his work is that he has a new Spitfire and is doing test flights. Andrew will, however, tell him about the girl he has met. He says she's the sort of girl you want to run out and buy flowers for, but her aunt runs a flower shop in Hastings, so she probably can't stand the sight of them. He asks his dad if he has ever thought of marrying again after being on his own for so long, but Foyle doesn't want to discuss it, and when his son presses he changes the subject and begins to look through some papers in his bureau. Andrew heads for bed, telling his father that he won't be in for the evening meal next day as he has a night op. He says, "Sleep well, Dad."
Foyle replies, "And you." He stands staring down at the papers in his hand and when his son has left the room, adds quietly, "Take care."

**
The next morning, policeman searching the wreckage of Davies' house find pieces of a broken statuette.

**
A jeweller has identified the locket and given the police the name of the owner. Foyle and Milner visit the home of Harold and Enid Smith in Eastbourne and are told that the locket was stolen from their house two weeks previously. The theft wasn't reported as the locket had only sentimental value, having belonged to their daughter who had died after falling in front of a train. When asked if the name Graham Davies means anything to them, husband and wife look at each other before saying no. Foyle watches the couple's reactions as Milner explains where the locket was found. Enid searches for an explanation. "Maybe he bought it from someone." Her husband cuts in. "We don't care who had it. We're just glad to have it back."

**
Andrew and Leighton-Morris eat in a seafront café. Leighton-Morris complains that he will be stuck in Hastings for another couple of days making a film for the Crown Film Unit about the need to conserve fuel. He asks Andrew what he is doing, but his friend refuses to talk about it. Leighton-Morris takes money from his wallet to pay the bill. Unseen by the two pilots, Henderson is watching.

**
As Sam drives Foyle to Wales she tells him that her father has insisted she return home immediately and so this will be her last drive. Foyle expresses regret. Sam asks if he would talk to her father about it and, although he is not sure it will help, he agrees.

Deep in the countryside, Foyle enters the facility in which the Whittington Collection is being kept. Foyle looks at some sketches of ballerinas by Francois Berot. The curator tells him that all 342 items checked into the lorry in London arrived safely in Wales.

**
Anne meets Andrew on the airfield after another tracking exercise and they talk on their way to the Manor. He comments on what he perceives to be a tense atmosphere on the base. She asks him if it is true that his father is a policeman, but is unforthcoming when he asks why she wants to know. Sensing fear in her, he tries to get her to explain, but without success. Andrew inquires about her friend Lucy and she tells him that the woman committed suicide, adding that it was all so wrong. Andrew asks if she wants him to tell his father something, but Anne is nervous and says no. She looks up, sees Keller watching them from the window of his office and tells Andrew she has to go.

Anne is summoned to Keller's office. He questions her about her conversation with Andrew and she admits that he asked about Lucy Smith. Keller tells Anne that she is being transferred immediately to the Isle of Wight.

**
During another low night flight, a plotter reports with alarm that there is no IFF signal from the Spitfire. As Andrew begins to respond to a radio call, he becomes the target of anti-aircraft guns. Graeme tells him to turn on his IFF signal, but receives the reply that it is on. The plotter reports that Andrew's plane is losing height, and then says that she has lost him altogether. The Spitfire's radio cuts out.

Andrew manages to land in a field six miles from the RAF station, and next morning Graeme explains to him that his IFF must have malfunctioned due to engine vibration. The group captain compliments him on his flying ability and tells him to take forty-eight hours leave. Andrew is not satisfied and suggests the possibility of tampering. Both Graeme and Keller dismiss the idea as crazy and Andrew is dismissed.

**
Foyle goes to the Royal Victoria Hotel to talk with the Reverend Iain Stewart. He tries to explain that Sam is doing a worthwhile job, but her father remains adamant that his daughter return to Lyminster. "If I am to be honest it's my personal feeling that Samantha would be better off at home."

Foyle says that he'd rather his son were at home, too, and when Stewart inquires where his son is, replies that he is a pilot with the RAF. Stewart winces, realising that while he is in a position to protect his daughter, the policeman is not in a position to protect his son.

**
Andrew goes to Hastings police station but is told by Milner that his father is not there. Milner asks if something is wrong and is startled when Andrew mutters, "Apart from someone trying to kill me, no…" Andrew will not say more, and asks that his father be told he has gone home.

Outside the station, Henderson identifies himself to Andrew as being from Special Branch, and arrests him on suspicion of conspiring to assist the enemy in contravention of the defence regulations.

**
When Foyle arrives at the police station a few minutes later and learns that Andrew was looking for him in some agitation, he goes immediately to Steep Lane. Sam counts it as her last drive. Foyle finds the front door of his house standing open and, inside, a number of Special Branch officers putting his private papers into boxes for removal. Henderson says he is from Special Branch and has a warrant for the search. Foyle is very angry when he learns of his son's arrest and is told he cannot see him.

**
Back at the station, an increasingly concerned Foyle rings a friend in Whitehall to ask if he can find out where Andrew is being held. Milner tells his boss that he can't find out anything about Henderson, but he will ask a friend at Scotland Yard. Foyle appreciates his efforts but tells him that he shouldn't get involved. He says he'd not going to be around for a couple of days, so the sergeant must take over the Davies case. The gallery obviously has something to do with it and he thinks the curator could be a thief. Neither policeman believes that the locket was stolen from the Smiths and both wonder if there is a link between the Smiths and Davies. Milner is to find out more about the daughter and how she died.

On his way out of the office, Foyle asks Hugh Reid to find a woman with a flower shop in Hastings and a niece called Anne. Reid warns his friend to be careful because they don't want him to be arrested as well.

**
In the Manor, Andrew is interrogated by Henderson while Keller looks on. He strenuously denies taking the classified documents and says someone planted them in his locker. He looks pointedly at Keller. He is asked about his association with Leighton-Morris and told that the officers know they met through membership of the British Communist Party, which Andrew joined in 1938 while at Oxford. Andrew says it was just like a club and he only went to half a dozen meetings before loosing interest.

Andrew is refused permission to see his father. He is stunned into silence when Keller warns him of the seriousness of having been found in possession of sensitive documents and being seen taking money from a prominent Communist agitator, who has since disappeared.

**
Foyle answers a knock at the door of his home and finds Anne on the doorstep. She asks for Andrew and he explains that his son isn't there. Realising who she is, he tells her that he thinks Andrew is in trouble, and asks her in. Anne goes into the house but is reluctant to answer any questions because she has signed the Official Secrets Act. She tells Foyle that she has been transferred, but she will not say why. Foyle comments that she is afraid, and she admits it is because of something that happened before Andrew came to the base. She will not say more, and makes to leave. Foyle is exasperated and insists that at least she help him the next step of the way. Anne supplies Alastair Graeme's name and the fact that he lives in Hastings, but that is all.

**
Foyle and Sam are parked in the street in which Alastair Graeme lives, which is just around the corner from Davies' house in Henley Terrace. When Graeme emerges, they follow him to a nearby pub. Sam suggests that she be the one to go in to see Graeme, as he might be more likely to talk to a girl over a drink. Foyle agrees.

Sam stands next to Graeme at the bar and orders a glass of sherry, which Graeme immediately offers to pay for. They talk, but Graeme avoids any attempt to get information about who he is and what he does. Eventually, the group captain's suspicions are aroused. He moves very close to Sam and puts an arm around her. Speaking in a low tone, he tells her that when a good-looking, well-developed young girl comes into a bar on her own and starts asking questions, it makes a man wonder, especially when she seems to have deliberately followed him in. He leans against her and says into her ear that she has a very loose tongue and should be careful what she does with it. "I think it's time you were on your way." He gives Sam a painful pinch, which makes her cry out with shock, and she leaves the pub in disgust and embarrassment.

Back in the Wolseley, Sam tells Foyle that the group captain rumbled her straight away. When her boss learns that Graeme pinched and hurt her he can't believe what he is hearing, and opens the car door, saying that he is going to speak to him. Sam stops him, saying that it would only confirm the man's suspicions. Foyle closes the car door again, but is frustrated at having to leave the matter at that.

**
Later that night, Graeme does not know that a man is watching as he leaves the pub and returns to his home. After a few minutes, the doorbell rings and Graeme goes to answer. When his wife Elizabeth hears a noise in the hallway, she investigates and finds her husband dying, a knife sticking out of his chest.

**
The next morning, the Revd Iain Stewart goes to the Hastings police station to pick up Sam. Milner tells him that she is not in and takes him into the office to wait. Stewart takes an interest in items from Davies' house that are lying on a desk, and identifies the broken statuette as being by Berot. He says he has seen it in the Whittington Collection in London. When Sam appears, her father tells her that he has come to collect her. Foyle is close behind and says she can't go yet, as she is needed. As the DCS and his driver leave, the clergyman looks thoughtful.

**
Foyle goes to see Elizabeth Graeme, but she refuses to say anything about her husband's work, saying she will talk to only the RAF.

As Foyle talks to Sam outside the house, Keller arrives. The wing commander tells him that Graeme's murder falls under the jurisdiction of the RAF and is nothing to do with him. Foyle says angrily that Keller has his son and he wants to see him. Keller brushes him off and turns towards the house. Foyle asks if he does not think the business with Andrew and the murder of Graeme are connected and Keller retorts that as he is now handling the investigation, it's his job to find out. Foyle informs him crisply that he is too late, he already knows who killed him and why. Keller turns back to face him. "Tell me."
Foyle is adamant. "Not until I've seen my son."

**
The DCS is taken to see Andrew and is locked in the cell with him. Foyle asks him about his Communist Party membership and Andrew explains that he became involved because of a girl, which doesn't surprise his father. Foyle tells his son that he knows he didn't take the documents, but somebody did and planted them in his locker. Andrew says that a lot of strange things have been going on. "A girl killed herself... Lucy." Foyle nods.

**
Milner goes to the Whittington Gallery in London and arrests Carmichael for theft. He explains to the curator what the police believe to have happened... Carmichael's shorthand use of S for sketch could also mean S for statuette. There was a Berot sketch of three separate dancers on a single sheet of paper. There was also a Berot statuette of a dancer. In the lorry, Davies secreted the statuette in a compartment under the seat and cut the sketch in two, so it would then count as two dancers. According to the records nothing would be missing. It was as if the statuette had never existed.

**
In the police station, Foyle congratulates his sergeant on Carmichael's arrest. Milner tells him that the Smiths were lying about their daughter Luc, explaining that she didn't fall under the train, she jumped.

Foyle is surprised when Sam enters the room, and comments on the fact that she is still in the station. She smiles happily and tells him that her father has changed his mind. She says that he was so excited to have helped solve a crime, he had decided that his daughter was doing an important job after all. Foyle pops his trilby onto his head and says, "Well that's wonderful. We don't have to walk!"

**
Harold and Enid Smith are not surprised to see the DCS again. Smith admits to the killing of Alastair Graeme, saying with disgust that the man deserved to die. Lucy was only nineteen when she went to the base. The group captain forced himself on her daughter and her parents had found out only when Lucy discovered she was pregnant. The girl couldn't bear the shame and had thrown herself in front of the train.

Foyle points out that more than one man was murdered. Harold hangs his head, saying that Davies' death was a dreadful mistake. The group captain's address had been on a note of condolence sent following Lucy's death, so, with Lucy's locket around his neck, he went to take revenge. However, the Hastings road signs had been removed, so he had to ask the way. When the man who answered the door of 10 Henley Crescent confirmed that his name was Graeme, Smith immediately stabbed him with the kitchen knife. Milner explains that Alastair Graeme lived at 10 Henley Crescent, but that Graham Davies lived at 10 Henley Terrace. The man of whom Smith had asked directions was very hard of hearing and had sent him to the wrong address.

Smith says he knows he will be hanged and that he deserves it and it will be Graham Davies he'll be thinking of when it happens. He stresses that taking revenge on Alastair Graeme was entirely his own idea and that Enid should be left out of it, but his wife takes his arm and, in tears, says in quiet but determined tones, "No, Harold, I want to come with you. It's over. It was over the day Lucy died."

**
Foyle goes to the Manor and demands of Keller that his son be freed. Keller protests that he himself has done absolutely nothing wrong in the whole affair, but Foyle points out that when Lucy Smith killed herself, he helped cover up Graeme's involvement. Keller says that whatever his personal failings, Alastair Graeme had a brilliant scientific mind and understood radar better than anyone in the country. Keller had a responsibility to keep him in him in command of the station, but he was against planting the documents in Andrew's locker. Foyle is singularly unimpressed, saying he still allowed it to happen. Keller protests again that he was simply doing what he thought was best for the war. Foyle replies that he is sure a great many Nazis would be saying exactly the same thing when the war was over. He forcefully demands that Andrew be released and not a word of the matter put on his record.

**
Foyle goes to the airfield to get Andrew. As the young pilot follows his father out of the building, he remarks, "You are brilliant, Dad. You know that?" To which Foyle replies, "Yep!"

As they walk along the edge of the airfield, Foyle explains that Graeme probably had not tried to kill Andrew, as he didn't have access to the plane. They look up as the noise of incoming aircraft is heard. An air raid siren sounds and the two men run for their lives as a bomb explodes near them. Andrew calls his dad to follow him into a bunker formed with sandbags, and they find themselves in darkness relieved only by the flashes of exploding bombs outside. Foyle detects a smell, and asks Andrew to light a match. In the flickering flame, the two men read ominous words stencilled on one of the metal drums stored in the bunker: Aviation Fuel Highly Flammable. Foyle closes his eyes briefly with the realisation of the perilous situation they are in, and calmly suggests that his son blow out the match. As Andrew complies, a tremendous explosion shakes the ground and fills the air with dust. Foyle straightens his trilby on his head and gives his son a pointed look. "Why have you brought us to shelter in a fuel dump, Andrew?"

After the raid, the two men emerge from the bunker and make their way through the smoking chaos outside. Andrew spots a car coming towards them, and calls his father's attention to it. Recognising the Wolseley, Foyle announces, "Here comes the cavalry!"

The car stops beside the two men. Milner is in the front seat alongside Sam, who says to Foyle, "We were worried about you, sir. Are you all right?"

Foyle smiles at Andrew and replies wryly, "Well, no thanks to this one!"

Milner assumes his boss will want his usual front seat, but instead Foyle climbs into the back of the Wolseley to sit beside his son, and the car leaves the ravaged airfield.

***
"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long." ~ Ogden Nash
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