Subtitle chuckles

The Eternity Ring (July 1946); The Cage (August 1946); Sunflower (Aug/Sept 1946)

Subtitle chuckles

Postby Lynnedean » Wed Oct 02, 2013 8:11 pm

I'm in process of doing the write-ups of the SR8 episodes, and I'm finding the inclusion of subtitles on the DVDs to be a great help. I do have to keep listening to the dialogue, though, as the transcription is not always accurate, and sometimes it's quite funny.

Two notable slip-ups in The Eternity Ring ...
Valentine's pronunciation is at times very RP (Received Pronunciation), so I can understand why, when he asks Foyle if he's aware that Senator Howard Paige is dead, the name that comes up on screen is Senator Hardpage.

Soon after, Foyle is shown into an office where Hilda Pierce is waiting for him. As he enters, she greets him with "Mr Foyle." However, according to the subtitles, her utterance is a little more familiar - "My Foyle." :lol:
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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby jewell » Wed Oct 02, 2013 8:55 pm

Lynne, I've noticed this on other programs too.

I read a bit faster than my SO and hear a bit better also. He gets a bit annoyed when I say "That's not what they said." Now I try to limit my comments about subtitle mistakes to things that are significant or funny.

I'll have to go back and review what it was that I thought was so funny on "Reckless" but it had something to do with how they subtitled Man(chester) United when Crane and Springer were discussing football. They weren't even near the ball field!

Thanks for your transcriptions.

Please tell us about any more funnies.

Jewell
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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby starlight » Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:52 am

:thankyou: Thank you Lynne for this labour of love. The writeups will be an invaluable resource.

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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby jewell » Fri Oct 04, 2013 1:23 pm

Lynne,

We watched "Sunflower" last night on the DVD with subtitles. I enjoyed it much more than when I first saw it. Not having to stop and explain to the SO all the time what was just said made it flow much better. :biggrin: I still am not fond of "new Sam" - I loved me some stalwart, boy scout Sam but on the whole I liked the episode much better this time.

My point after dragging it out: When Foyle is questioning the ex-SOE chap, Parry-Jones, in the pub after Strasser was killed, Parry-Jones says something about "their oh-be-joyfuls". After replaying it many times we think he says "rubbing" while the subtitles say "having".

What does he say? Is this a common phrase? The meaning is clear so you don't have to spell that out, thankfully.

Thank you for your help.

Jewell
"When they ask why, I'll go: well, it's the least, no, honestly, it's the very bloody least I could do!

"And not just decked him. No! Fried the devious, dirty bastard to a crisp in the luxury of his over-waxed car!"
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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby amiga » Fri Oct 04, 2013 5:20 pm

"their oh-be-joyfuls". I just loved that. Another one I like is "leg over". The English have such a way with words. :lol:

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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby Lynnedean » Fri Oct 04, 2013 11:08 pm

Haven't heard the phrase "the oh-be-joyfuls" in a very long time; if it's still used, it may be more in the south of the country. It just means a feeling of happiness, or something that makes you happy, so it could refer to different things depending on the contexts in which it's used. Parry-Jones definitely says "they were having the oh-be-joyfuls", and, as you say, the intended meaning in this case is clear. But oh, Jewell, you've had me in hysterics by saying that you think he says "they were rubbing the oh-be-joyfuls" - never again will I be able to watch that scene and hear Parry-Jones say that line without getting an uncontrollable fit of the giggles!

You might like to take a listen to this old recording from the 1960s. It's a very well-known British entertainer (who is now in his 80s and still going, though some of us wish he'd pack it in now :-? ) singing a song entitled "The Oh-Be-Joyfuls" ... 1962: Bruce Forsyth singing "The Oh-Be-Joyfuls"

By the way, Amiga - "leg over" is a common expression in the UK, but generally not used in polite company. :D
Last edited by Lynnedean on Fri Oct 04, 2013 11:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby amiga » Fri Oct 04, 2013 11:17 pm

Lynnedean wrote:
By the way, Amiga - "leg over" is a common expression in the UK, but generally not used in polite company. :D


I know, that's why it makes me laugh. Sure beats much cruder expressions for the same thing. :lol: :lol:

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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby Wolesley » Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:02 am

That's a blast from the past, Lynne!

I would think the phrase obliquely refers to a sort of "revivalist" Christian hymn of the more jubilant variety (in the context of the scene in the pub: the sounds of happy canoodling not unlike an enthusiastically sung spiritual song), although I can't find a hymn with exactly that title or phrase. A google search suggests it can also refer to drink supplied to soldiers.

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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby jewell » Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:20 am

Lynne,

Thank you for clearing that all up.

I'm glad our 'murican ears can cause you fits of laughter. Only slightly embarrassed that we took him to being euphemistic about parts instead speaking about the general mood. :oops: And I think our version is funnier, too.

Thanks, too, for the link. I won't be able to listen to it until Monday when I'm back at work but I'm looking forward to it then.

Lesley, interesting about the hymns, if that's the case, oh-be-joyfuls is certainly used ironically in this instance. Perhaps the phrase is also ironic when describing soldier's drinks. I know the simple triangular can opener that you used to use to open beer cans is referred to as a "church key" so the juxtaposition of church terminology and "sin" is widespread.

Very interesting and fun. I'm glad I asked. I don't know if I will tell the SO, he really enjoyed the phrase "rubbing their oh-be-joyfuls" why ruin it for him?

Jewell
"When they ask why, I'll go: well, it's the least, no, honestly, it's the very bloody least I could do!

"And not just decked him. No! Fried the devious, dirty bastard to a crisp in the luxury of his over-waxed car!"
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Re: Subtitle chuckles

Postby Lynnedean » Sat Oct 05, 2013 8:24 am

Wolesley wrote:I would think the phrase obliquely refers to a sort of "revivalist" Christian hymn of the more jubilant variety (in the context of the scene in the pub: the sounds of happy canoodling not unlike an enthusiastically sung spiritual song), although I can't find a hymn with exactly that title or phrase. [...] Lesley (being a touch pedantic, perhaps)

You're probably right, Lesley. There are biblical texts, notably in the Psalms, that include the exhortation to be joyful, but none that begins with "oh" (working on the King James Version, the applicable one here). However, religious music and liturgy based on biblical text has included the "oh" in translation of such as Ps 100, e.g. the anthem by Handel, titled "Oh, be joyful", and the Jubilate Deo, used in Anglican liturgy. It must surely also occur in some of the old revivalist Gospel songs.

Gee, how riveting can a message board discussion get? :lol:


PS: You can't beat me for pedantry, kidda. :D
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