Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

3: The French Drop(Feb '41);Enemy Fire(Feb '41);They Fought In the Fields(April '41); War of Nerves(June '41)

2: Fifty Ships (Sept '40); Among the Few (Sept '40); War Games (Oct '40); The Funk Hole (Oct '40)

1: The German Woman(May '40);The White Feather(May '40);A Lesson in Murder(June '40);Eagle Day(Aug '40)

Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby annebronterocks » Tue May 19, 2015 10:04 pm

I've never been able to figure out what book Foyle finds Paul reading when he visits him in the hospital and we get our first hint at what an awful wife Jane is. Can anybody clue me in?
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby HarrietVane » Wed May 20, 2015 12:33 am

Based on some quick fast forwarding and freeze-framing with the DVD, I think it's Tappan's Burro by Zane Grey, in this edition: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks12/120183 ... rro-C3.jpg
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby annebronterocks » Wed May 20, 2015 11:05 am

Thanks, Harriet. I had been wondering whether it was some sort of children's story book since he seemed a bit embarrassed to be caught reading it by Foyle. I guess Westerns just aren't Paul's thing.
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby HarrietVane » Wed May 20, 2015 6:57 pm

annebronterocks wrote:Thanks, Harriet. I had been wondering whether it was some sort of children's story book since he seemed a bit embarrassed to be caught reading it by Foyle. I guess Westerns just aren't Paul's thing.


Based on that embarrassed response of Milner's, I expected it to be a book of fairy tales. I'm not sure how Zane Grey was regarded at the time - a bit pulpy, maybe? Or just oppressively American?
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby starlight » Wed May 20, 2015 7:21 pm

HarrietVane wrote:
annebronterocks wrote:Thanks, Harriet. I had been wondering whether it was some sort of children's story book since he seemed a bit embarrassed to be caught reading it by Foyle. I guess Westerns just aren't Paul's thing.


Based on that embarrassed response of Milner's, I expected it to be a book of fairy tales. I'm not sure how Zane Grey was regarded at the time - a bit pulpy, maybe? Or just oppressively American?

My understanding is that he was popular and well-regarded - reputedly Eisenhower's favourite author. But Grey's stuff was none-the-less 'Old West escapism', which might explain Milner's awkwardness (and in any case, Eisenhower wasn't exactly part of the scene around the time Milner got his leg shot off).
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby Lynette » Wed May 20, 2015 9:55 pm

Zane Grey was a massively popular writer in the early 20th century -- one of the two giants of popular literature along with Edgar Rice Burroughs. These guys sold books by the millions in both the US and the UK, far outstripping the "literary" authors of the day like Sinclair Lewis, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, etc. Both had a flamboyant over-the-top literary style and were unabashedly xenophobic and white supremacist (especially Burroughs). There's a great discussion of their literary careers in Bill Bryson's One Summer: America 1927 -- a fantastic read, by the way.

When I was in high school, 1980-1982, my first job was shelving books at my local public library in the Washington, DC suburbs. We had a Western collection that was mostly Zane Grey and Louis L'Amour, and those books still moved among a certain readership, mostly senior citizens. Don't think you'd find much Zane Grey in public libraries today, though.
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby annebronterocks » Wed May 20, 2015 10:58 pm

My own knowledge of Zane Grey comes mostly from watching MASH. He was Colonel Potter's favorite author and he was definitely super popular during the '40s. Although not necessarily with a British readership, I suppose... I guess Paul just thought it was too pulpy a thing to be caught reading by someone as exalted as DCS Foyle. :wink:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby kitchentease » Thu May 21, 2015 12:53 am

We had very few books in the public library where I lived as a child. Most had been sent by generous donors in America, so plenty of Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey. For a long time, I thought America consisted entirely of cowboys and Indians. I can imagine that there might not have been a lot to choose from in the library of a military hospital either.
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby jewell » Thu May 21, 2015 12:17 pm

Or, his embarrassment could be a wee bit of 21st century sensibilities creeping into the 1940's.

Or it may reflect AH's (Horowitz, not Howell) tastes. A little inside joke from an author?

On another note, I saw that the jpg HarrietVane posted was from the Gutenberg site - although, now that I look more critically, the Australian Gutenberg site, funny I supposed there would be only one - Anyhow, I went to gutenberg.org thinking I might read Tappen's Burro and it wasn't listed. Hmmm, may have to try the Australian site. I did download Riders of the Purple Sage, I've heard of Zane Grey all my life - my grandmother was a fan - but have never read any of his books. It will be fun to try.

As to whether a modern library would still have any Zane Grey, my library in a small Midwestern city shows 52 books, half of them large print. Still popular here, I suppose since they're always culling for shelf space.

They don't have Tappen's Burro either. :foyle3:

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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby Lynnedean » Thu May 21, 2015 1:47 pm

jewell wrote:Or, his embarrassment could be a wee bit of 21st century sensibilities creeping into the 1940's.

[...] I did download Riders of the Purple Sage, I've heard of Zane Grey all my life - my grandmother was a fan - but have never read any of his books. It will be fun to try.

As to whether a modern library would still have any Zane Grey, my library in a small Midwestern city shows 52 books, half of them large print. Still popular here, I suppose since they're always culling for shelf space.

They don't have Tappen's Burro either. :foyle3:

The particular story Tappan's Burro, or Westerns in general, may have been thought a bit "boy's own" perhaps.

If you really want a copy, Jewell, AbeBooks has several at around only $3.45, postage free ... AbeBooks: Tappan's Burro

Where writers of Westerns are concerned, Zane Grey was top of the tree way back when, and may still be, but be warned that he's rather heavy on description - you get pages and pages of it, and end up wondering when the action is going to start. I love Westerns, but, because of that, his books aren't for me. The wonderful Jack Schaefer is top of my personal list; of his novels, Shane, Monte Walsh and The Canyon are my favourites.
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby HarrietVane » Thu May 21, 2015 1:58 pm

jewell wrote:now that I look more critically, the Australian Gutenberg site, funny I supposed there would be only one


I know of three English-language Project Gutenberg sites - http://www.gutenberg.org (US-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical US copyright law guideline of author's lifetime + 70 years) , http://www.gutenberg.ca/ (Canada-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical Canadian copyright law guideline of author's lifetime +50 years) and http://gutenberg.net.au/ (Australia-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical Australian copyright law guideline of author's lifetime +50 years.)

(I say "historical" because copyright law in all three countries is much more complicated than that now, but for much of the twentieth century those guidelines were the basis of determining when works passed into the public domain, and in most cases changes to copyright law have not been retroactive so material that passed into the public domain X years after an author's death has not become re-protected even if X+3 years after an author's death laws changed to protect work for X+25 years after an author's death.)

So if you don't find something you think should be old enough to be in the public domain on one site, try the others, in case it falls into the twenty-year gap between US and Australian or Canadian standards. :foyle1:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby Wolesley » Fri May 22, 2015 12:40 am

I seem to be able to read the whole book here. At least, the pages keep turning, without any limit.

https://archive.org/details/tappansburroothe01grey

Give it a try!

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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby hazeleyes57 » Fri May 22, 2015 12:48 pm

Many years ago, I was stuck in my mum-in-law's house one Sunday. T'men folk were oop at t'pub (no place fer a lass) and she wouldn't let me help (interfere) with cooking the Sunday roast, so she suggested I read some of my (then) fiance's books, up in his old room, and yes, they were Louis L'Amour. Having read two by the time the others got back, I realised that Louis L'Amour wrote 'Mills and Boon' style romances for men. I was expecting a cross between a western and a detective-style thriller, but nope, it was romance for men. And, why not? :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby HarrietVane » Fri May 22, 2015 1:19 pm

Here's the image - just for reference. :foyle1:

Image
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby jewell » Fri May 22, 2015 1:27 pm

HarrietVane wrote:I know of three English-language Project Gutenberg sites - http://www.gutenberg.org (US-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical US copyright law guideline of author's lifetime + 70 years) , http://www.gutenberg.ca/ (Canada-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical Canadian copyright law guideline of author's lifetime +50 years) and http://gutenberg.net.au/ (Australia-based, containing primarily though not exclusively works which passed into the public domain under the historical Australian copyright law guideline of author's lifetime +50 years.)
...
So if you don't find something you think should be old enough to be in the public domain on one site, try the others, in case it falls into the twenty-year gap between US and Australian or Canadian standards. :foyle1:

Thanks for the info, HV. I never even considered that there would be different sites for different copyright laws. Makes sense, I suppose.

And here I was thinking the Gutenberg site I was frequenting had everything there was. :foyle4:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby annebronterocks » Fri May 22, 2015 2:04 pm

Harriet, how the heck did you get such a marvelous still from the DVD? :shock:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby ayresorchids » Fri May 22, 2015 2:27 pm

What a marvelous discussion. Love this list. :hug:
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Re: Milner's Reading Material in "The German Woman"

Postby HarrietVane » Fri May 22, 2015 3:24 pm

annebronterocks wrote:Harriet, how the heck did you get such a marvelous still from the DVD? :shock:


That one I actually got off the episode on Hulu (because the usual screencap shortcut (command-shift-3) on my mac only gives me a gray box when I try from the DVD). It took a few runs through to click at just the right moment.
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